Art & Design

10 Office Spaces That’ll Get You Out Of Bed

Interior greenery boosts productivity by up to 20%!

[emphasized type=”emphasized”]How many times have you dreamt about turning your boring office into an inspiring, creative space you actually want to work in?[/emphasized]

It’s no secret that your environment affects your mood. And when you’re at work, that concept is no different. In fact, something as simple as the wall colour can have a huge impact on your quality of work.

Have you been so ground down that you’re not quite sure what an inspiring workplace even looks like anymore? We feel you. So from Belgrade to Nagoya, we’re taking a look at some of the most creative spaces around the globe, to add a little inspiration to your daily grind.

 

Barbarian Group
Barbarian Group

Barbarian Group

USA

When you work a desk job, that desk usually isn’t shared with everyone in the office, or a self-supporting structure that looks like a plywood bat cave. Well, that was until NYC based tech creatives, Barbarian Group, made that exact desk. They realized that the only criteria in a modern office was to have a flat surface to work on, so why not make that surface the feature of the office! The plywood structure creates its own spaces that can house meetings, or storage areas, and then also transforms into the feature ‘flat surface’ for everyone in the office to use! Point to take away? If all you need is a laptop, make every surface a feature of the space.

 

Park + Associates
Park + Associates

Park + Associates

Singapore

Originally a school built in the 1960s, this repurposed space is now home to the architectural studio Park + Associates. The space is organised into multiple informal “spatial experiences,” that shatter the traditional office sentiment of specific rooms with established roles. While there is “more liberated creative output” from the employees who experience an informal environment, the darker tones help maintain a more professional focus within the informal space.

 

reMIX Studio
reMIX Studio

reMIX Studio

China 

Painting the walls white, having a sealed concrete floor, and then slapping the ‘studio’ tag on your space is sometimes only a disguise for creative design. Not the case for ReMIX Studio in Beijing, who really took the use of materials and modular design of their studio space to the next level. Blending juxtaposing materials like rough exposed brick, with slick steel surfaces, while also contrasting light and dark colour tones works to stimulate the senses of their employees.

 

Ganna Studio
Ganna Studio

Ganna Studio

Taiwan

It’s always a risk mixing your work and home life together, as the line of professional and personal spaces can become heavily blurred. Ganna studio has successfully walked that line with their home studio. Based in Taipei, the interior contains multiple bi-fold screens that allow in natural light, and create a non-invasive privacy between the living and working spaces. (Oh and by the way, start letting some more sun into your space, natural light is a MUST for modern creatives! As well as those Vitamin D levels.)

 

Lehrer Architects Studio
Lehrer Architects Studio

Lehrer Architects

USA

Working without a budget? So was Lehrer Architects before creating an exceptional space, that is so successful it’s consistently utilized by film screenings, community events and even weddings! The cheap (but very slick) epoxy floor runs the entire length of the studio, which is barely lit by artificial light, rather filled with natural light all year round (there’s a reoccurring theme here, guys…)

Industrial style steel shelving is an inexpensive way to create a modernised library, across from a large blank wall used to pin up current models and designs that unlike computer monitors, are always visible and always stimulating.

 

Mamiya Schinichi Studio
Mamiya Schinichi Studio

Mamiya Schinichi Studio

Japan

Ahhh, Japanese design… always nailing the minimalist aesthetic, without using it as an excuse for a blank white box and sticking a plant in the corner (#minimal). The Mamiya Schinichi architectural studio took their inspiration from a safari park, which has zero fences to constrain visitors. The floor-to-ceiling timber columns create both a shelving system, and solves the problem of simple space organisation. The shelves also offer an airy and interactive way of separating spaces and sectioning off different areas of the studio.

 

MER Studio
MER Studio

MER

Sweden

“Our office is one of our best marketing tools”, an idea that should resonate with every business owner who has clients enter their office space. That quote comes from MER studio, in the gorgeous Swedish capital of Stockholm. MER utilizes multiple colours, textures and styles across their studio, as a sort-of “exhibition” for both their employees and clients.

 

Nova Iskra Studio
Nova Iskra Studio

Nova Iskra

Serbia

With exposed concrete walls and ceilings, the design incubator based in Belgrade, looks like a command centre for a Hollywood super villain. The studio is designed by Petokraka, and houses many ‘design nomads’ looking for a peaceful but attentive space. The industrial style can sometimes look like a brutalist dream, so a glass façade resides in the centre of the office, which adds a softer element to the room. Again, darker grey tones are utilised to create a quieter, more focused space for professionals across multiple disciplines.

 

Ekimetrics Studio in Paris
Ekimetrics Studio in Paris

Ekimetrics

France 

The editor’s pick, but you’ll be hard pressed to apply much to your home office from this studio, based inside a 19th century Parisian building on the Champs-Elysees. This absolutely jaw-dropping marketing agency has created an experimental concept inside this classicists dream, resulting in something you can’t quite take your eyes off. Painted ceilings and gold moldings create an insane contrast to the modernized wood structures below, which act as studio spaces to the employees lucky enough to work in a repurposed Parisian Palace.

 

 

Selgascano Studio
Selgascano Studio

Selgascano

Spain

When Spanish architectural studio Salgascano wanted to work “beneath the trees”, they took the idea slightly more literal than most. Their studio is based partially underground and has a thin Plexiglas roof, which allows employees to literally work underneath the tree canopy. Besides the huge amount of natural light allowed into the studio, the glass roof allows occupants to watch the seasons change the landscape and colours of the surrounding environment.

Source: The Creative Workspace, Roads Publishing

 

THE TAILORED MAN
Marten Ascenzo
Marten is a Melbourne based designer and writer with a background in architecture and graphic design. When he's not dabbling as The Tailored Man's photographer, he's working inside a fashion startup as a creative designer.